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Research tells us that social media can cause anxiety, distraction, loneliness and FOMO (fear of missing out), yet technology is woven so intricately into our everyday lives — personally and professionally — that many educators question if it’s even possible to take a break.

“Making space in the classroom to have conversations about social media use and self-care is a great place to start.”

But educators are not only making choices about their own digital participation, they’re also teaching students about creating a healthy relationship with technology. Making space in the classroom to have conversations about social media use and self-care is a great place to start. Sharing that a #DigitalDetox isn’t just for young people, but for adults as well, can be empowering for students to hear.

Benefits of taking a digital detox:

  1. Increases productivity
  2. Allows you to be more present in your everyday life
  3. Allows more time for self-reflection without distraction
  4. Provides clarity
  5. Decreases anxiety
  6. Increases awareness of self and surroundings
  7. Allows you to stop comparing yourself to others While it may be difficult to stop using your phone, computer, tablet and smart watch entirely, here are some ways, big and small, to perform a #DigitalDetox.
  8. Delete apps you don’t use
  9. Unfollow social media accounts that don’t add value or joy to your life
  10. Turn off all push notifications for a day (both phone and watch)
  11. Don’t do social media in the morning (before 10 a.m.)
  12. Don’t do social media 90 minutes before bedtime
  13. On weekends, spend no more than an hour a day online
  14. Check in on a friend who appears to be living their best life on social media (it isn’t always as it seems!)

Did you try any of these tips? How did it turn out? Let us know (after your detox!): @WeAreCTA on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook.